Disease models

Disease models

Four organ-on-a-chip systems are established to study the biological aspects of ex vivo living tissue structures und physiological relevant measurement conditions. The premise of the organ-on-a-chip is the re-creation of the biological niche on chip to study cellular responses and tissue dysfunctions including Parkinson’s, rheumatic arthritis, and osteoarthritis as well as vascularization.

Parkinson's model

Midbrain organoids-on-a-chip

Midbrain organoids-on-a-chip

One of the main limitations in neuroscience and in the modeling of neurodegenerative diseases is the lack of advanced experimental in vitro models that truly recapitulate the complexity of the human brain. Therefore, it is the aim of the here proposed research project to generate brain-like organoids that resemble the human midbrain and their integration into a multifunctional lab-on-a-chip device.

Partners:

Funding:
logo BMBWF

Rheumatic arthritis model

synovium-on-a-chip

Synovium-on-a-chip

The aim of this project is to integrate a living tissue analogue that resembles the inner lining of a joint capsule into our complementary cell chip system. Called “synovial organ-on-a-chip”, this lab-on-a-chip will be used to study the destructive inflammatory process of rheumatoid synovitis by investigating the dynamic structural changes of the organ model.

Partners:
logo Medical University Vienna logo AKH Vienna

Funding:
logo WWTF

Osteoarthritis model

Cartilage-on-a-chip

Cartilage-on-a-chip

The aim of this project is to integrate a living tissue analogue that resembles the inner lining of a joint capsule into our complementary cell chip system. Called “synovial organ-on-a-chip”, this lab-on-a-chip will be used to study the destructive inflammatory process of rheumatoid synovitis by investigating the dynamic structural changes of the organ model.

Partners:

Vascularization model

Vascularization model

Vascularization model

We have engineered three-dimensional pre-vascular networks within fibrin hydrogel constructs by microfluidic control over reciprocal cell signaling to study the impact of nutrient gradients on network formation.

Partners: